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Dogs + Medical Conditions

  • There are two forms of diabetes in dogs: diabetes insipidus ("weak or watery diabetes") and diabetes mellitus ("sugar diabetes"). Diabetes insipidus (DI) gets its name from the fact that the urine of these patients is dilute enough to be “tasteless” or “insipid.” Diabetes insipidus (DI) is rare in dogs, and is characterized by excessive thirst/drinking and the production of enormous volumes of extremely dilute urine.

  • Diabetes mellitus is a disease of the pancreas, a small but vital organ located near the stomach. The clinical signs of diabetes mellitus are related to elevated concentrations of blood glucose and the inability of the body to use glucose as an energy source.

  • This handout provides detailed information on insulin administration. Consistent treatment is a vital component of the proper management of the diabetic dog. Once you are coached on how to give them, you may be pleasantly surprised at how easy it is and how well your dog tolerates the injections.

  • Diabetes mellitus is caused by the failure of the pancreas to regulate blood sugar. In dogs, diabetes mellitus is usually insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (also called Type 1 diabetes). As the name implies, dogs with this type of diabetes require insulin injections to stabilize blood sugar levels.

  • Diabetic ketoacidosis is a medical emergency that occurs when there is not enough insulin in the body to control blood sugar (glucose) levels. If left untreated, diabetic ketoacidosis is fatal.

  • Diarrhea is the passage of unformed or loose stools, usually in increased volume and/or increased frequency. Diarrhea is not a disease but rather a symptom of many different diseases. Diarrhea associated with minor conditions can often be resolved quickly with simple treatments.

  • A simple checklist to prepare for your veterinarian if your dog has diarrhea.

  • Dilated cardiomyopathy is a disease that causes the heart muscle cells to become weak and frequently causes abnormal heart beats to occur. Both of these problems can cause the heart to lose its ability contract or pump blood effectively out to the body.

  • Cardiomyopathy is defined as degeneration of the heart muscle. As a result of this degeneration, the muscle becomes thinner, particularly the thick muscle wall of the left ventricle. The pressure of the blood inside the heart causes these thin walls to stretch resulting in a much larger heart.

  • Discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE), also known as cutaneous lupus erythematosus, is an autoimmune disease that affects the skin, in which the body’s own immune system is activated to attack the body. Dogs with DLE develop crusting and scabbing of the skin, most commonly starting around the nose, as well as a loss of skin pigmentation in the affected area.

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