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Dental

  • Oral fibrosarcomas are rapidly growing, malignant tumors originating from the fibrous connective tissue of the mouth and may be cured by surgical removal. Recurrence in the mouth and spread to other parts of the body (metastasis) are common.

  • Like us, cats can develop oral masses. Some will grow slowly and won’t spread to other locations (benign), while others will spread to different areas of the body causing great harm (malignant).

  • Oral fibrosarcomas are rapidly growing, malignant tumors originating from the fibrous connective tissue of the mouth and may be cured by surgical removal. Recurrence in the mouth and spread to other parts of the body (metastasis) are common.

  • Oral melanoma ("malignant melanoma" or "melanosarcoma") is a tumor of melanin pigment producing cells (melanocytes) in the mouth. These cancers are rapidly growing and are rarely completely cured by surgical removal. Regrowth in the mouth and spread to other parts of the body (metastasis) are common.

  • Like us, dogs can develop oral masses. Some will grow slowly and won’t spread to other locations (benign), while others will spread to different areas of the body causing great harm (malignant).

  • Occasionally, teeth in cats do not come out in the right location, which may create pain when they close their mouths. When this happens, decisions on what to do come down to either moving the teeth to comfortable positions, decreasing the height of the teeth so they do not stick into the opposite jaw, or moving the teeth to comfortable and functional positions.

  • Occasionally, teeth in dogs do not come out in the right location, which may create pain when they close their mouths. When this happens, decisions on what to do come down to either moving the teeth to comfortable positions, decreasing the height of the teeth so they do not stick into the opposite jaw, or moving the teeth to comfortable and functional positions.

  • Dental x-rays in cats are similar to those taken in humans. An x-ray machine using small amounts of radiation is used to “see” the inside of your cat’s teeth and those areas below the gum line that are hidden from view.

  • Dental x-rays in dogs are similar to those taken in humans. An x-ray machine using small amounts of radiation, is used to “see” the inside of your dog’s teeth and those areas below the gum line that are hidden from view.

  • Tooth resorption (TR) is one of the more common oral abnormalities seen in cats. In the past, tooth resorption was referred to as feline oral resorptive lesions, odontoclastic resorptions, cavities, caries, cervical neck lesions, external or internal root resorptions, and cervical line erosions.

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Altoona, IA 50009
Phone: (515) 967-4281
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