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Care & Wellness

  • Cats are highly attached to territory, and movement away from that secure base is not something that is undertaken lightly! Traveling in cars, planes and other forms of human transportation can be a very stressful experience for all concerned, in part because the cat is no longer in control of its own experience.

  • Most male animals that are kept for companionship, work, or food production (stallions, dogs, tomcats, bulls, rams and boars) are neutered (castrated) unless they are intended to be used as breeding stock.

  • There are many circumstances in which keeping a cat indoors may be safer for the cat and therefore, arguably, better for the cat. Indoor cats are at lower risk for injuries associated with the outdoor environment (cars, trains, dogs, predators, humans, etc.) and are at far less risk of contracting parasites and infectious diseases such as feline leukemia, feline infectious peritonitis and feline immunodeficiency virus.

  • Some cats seem to take moving in their stride, but for others the loss of their familiar territory can be very traumatic, and settling in to the new home can pose problems for owners and cats alike.

  • The toys that you choose for your cat must take into account the natural behavior of the species. Often the simple ones are the best and ones that offer unpredictable movement, rapid movement and high-pitched sound are likely to provide your cat with hours of entertainment.

  • Spraying is the deposition of small amounts of urine on vertical surfaces. In most cases, the spraying cat will back into the area, the tail may quiver, and with little or no crouching, will urinate.

  • Some cats are active at night, or are awake and “raring to go” very early in the morning. Since many owners are out at work or school during the day, the cat may spend the daytime hours in rest and relaxation, especially if it is the only pet in the household.

  • Cats present their own medical challenges and unique healthcare issues, so the Cat Friendly Practice program provides guidance to the veterinary healthcare team to address those needs.

  • Veterinarians and veterinary healthcare teams who dedicate themselves to see only cats place a high value on their feline patients’ distinct needs. They are especially interested in delivering medical care to cats in ways that help the cat (and its human family members) experience as little stress as possible.

  • Many cat owners worry that making their cats stay inside is unnatural and deprives them of their need to roam, explore, and meet other cats. However, in our modern world, the risks of an outdoor life are far greater than the benefits. This handout answers some of the questions you may have about letting your cat spend time outdoors.

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3070 8th St SW
Altoona, IA 50009
Phone: (515) 967-4281
Fax: (515)967-8824


After Hours Emergency
IVS: (515) 280-305
IVRC: (515)727-4872



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