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Dogs + Behavior

  • Although he is devoted to his family – especially to children – the Pyr likes his own space; if you want a Velcro dog, this breed is not for you. That said, the Pyr has much to offer the right individual or family: a calm, sedate demeanor, devotion to the household and its inhabitants, and a willingness to protect all concerned.

  • The Greater Swiss Mountain Dog is a big sweetie-pie; despite his large size, he likes to cuddle with his people and may even think that he's a lap dog.

  • Aloof with strangers, the Greyhound enjoys familial attention, but is not demanding. Greyhounds are perfectly content to lie on a cushy bed and watch you doing your household chores.

  • Unfortunately, our pets do not live as long as we do. When the time comes to say goodbye, we experience feelings and emotions that sometimes embarrass us, and often confuse us. These feelings actually follow a well-recognized cycle, with stages of mourning and grief that are universal and are experienced by everyone to a greater or lesser extent following the loss of a loved one, be it a person or a pet. If you feel particularly vulnerable or feel that you are having difficulty with the mourning cycle, do not be afraid to discuss this with your family doctor or your veterinarian.

  • Do dogs and cats instinctively understand right and wrong? Do they understand they've done something wrong when their owners get upset, and they subsequently act guilty?

  • The Harrier is a typical scent hound: born with a love of the hunt and the desire to follow his nose wherever it leads. But he's more than that when he's given the chance. He's a mild-mannered sort, tolerant and good with children.

  • Who could resist that fuzzy face? The Havanese is a delightful companion for all ages. They have plenty of stamina to keep up with the most energetic child. Bichon-type dogs often perform in circuses and happily show off tricks for their families and other spectators.

  • Head halters are commonly used as an alternative to neck control collars and have many advantages. Firstly, they make control easier, requiring less physical effort, so you don’t end up battling with your pet or trying to save your shoulders from being pulled out of their sockets when going for a walk like you do when using a flat neck collar.

  • Although drugs may be useful in some cases, they should only be given under veterinary supervision. To be effective, they must be absorbed and active in the body BEFORE any noise starts or panic sets in. This is usually at least an hour prior to the event.

  • All it requires are a few basic rules to house train puppies within a short amount of time, sometimes as little as a few days to a few weeks. It is advisable to select a site that has an easy and direct access to the outdoors. By regularly taking the dog outdoors, through the same door, to the same site, and providing rewards for proper elimination, the puppy should soon learn to head for the door each time it has to eliminate.

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