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Dogs + Care & Wellness

  • The general condition of your dog’s skin and coat are good indicators of its health. A healthy coat should be shiny and smooth, not brittle or coarse, and healthy skin should be supple and clear, not greasy, flaky or bumpy. Although health and nutrition influence the luster and texture of your pet’s coat from the inside, regular grooming and skin care on the outside will help keep your dog’s coat clean and free of tangles, no matter what type of hair coat he or she has.

  • Cocker Spaniels, as one of the most popular breeds, suffered a bad reputation for a few years because of poor breeding practices by some eager for a dollar, but these dogs are now safely secure as a treasured family pet once again. Their cheerful "ready-to-go-when-you-are" demeanor makes them great companions.

  • Gentle, graceful and sweet, the Collie wags her tail gently whenever approached. Eyes seem to smile their welcome. They're willing to do the same chore again and again, only asking a loving touch in thanks.

  • Constipation is infrequent or difficult passage of stool, and is typically a temporary condition. Many constipated dogs will experience straining or pain when attempting to defecate.

  • One of the most common injuries to the knee of dogs is tearing of the cranial cruciate ligament (CCL). This ligament is similar to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in humans. There are actually two cruciate ligaments inside the knee: the cranial cruciate ligament and caudal cruciate ligament. They are called “cruciate” because they “cross” over each other inside the middle of the knee.

  • One of the most common injuries to the knee of dogs is tearing of the cranial cruciate ligament (CCL). This ligament is similar to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in humans. There are actually two cruciate ligaments inside the knee: the cranial cruciate ligament and caudal cruciate ligament. They are called “cruciate” because they “cross” over each other inside the middle of the knee.

  • Dogs are highly social animals that make wonderful pets; however, with the lifestyle and schedule of the majority of families, dogs must learn to spend a portion of the day alone at home while their human family is away. Training the dog to spend time in a crate will prevent undesirable or unsafe activities.

  • Weight loss is tough for anyone – two- or four-legged. However, losing weight and getting in shape can add not only years to your dog’s life, it can also make those extra years more enjoyable. You should never put your dog on a diet without the assistance of your veterinary healthcare team. There may be an underlying medical condition that is causing or contributing to your dog's excess weight.

  • No, it is not a Lab with a perm - those fashionable and form-fitting curls are all natural for the aptly named Curly-Coated Retriever. One of the most eye-catching of the sporting breeds, the Curly boasts curls that would take us hours at the hairdresser to achieve, yet the coat maintenance of the Curly is surprisingly simple.

  • Dogs, like people, can develop a variety of bladder and kidney stones. Bladder stones (uroliths or cystic calculi), are rock-like formations of minerals that form in the urinary bladder, and are more common than kidney stones in dogs. A somewhat rare form of urolith in the dog is composed of cystine crystals.

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Altoona, IA 50009
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